Fear of Bulking and other Diet Superstitions

Fear of Bulking and other Diet Superstitions

Facebook just showed me this photo.  It was from five years ago.  I remember thinking at the time, “Getting a bit tubby there.  You really need to lose weight.”  Apparently I didn’t take that advice for a long time.  Now, as I come to the end of the first phase of my body changing journey, I’d like to reflect back on some lessons that I’ve learned along the way and let you know my plans for the future.  Hopefully you can learn something from my experiences that will make your own journey even easier.

Progress so far

I started this journey around 212 pounds and am, as of this morning, 167.4 pounds (45 pounds for those of you bad at math).  It has taken exactly 7 months and 4 days to get to this point.  Most of my progress was made on the Kinobody Aggressive Fat Loss (AFL) program.  I have very strictly monitored my caloric intake and tracked my protein, fat, and carbohydrate intake.  I’ve worked out three times a week (45 minute weight workouts) and walked on the off days.  I haven’t done any running or high intensity cardio workout except for recreational (riding a bike with the kids) or situational (sprinting to get out of the rain).

As for the 45 pounds, I’ve actually lost more than 45 pounds of fat, because I’ve added some muscle along the way.  For example, today I did 6 chin ups with 50 pounds attached.  When I started I could barely do four bodyweight chin ups.  For the purposes of this post, I’ll guesstimate five pounds of muscle for a total of 50 pounds of fat gone.

Superstitions

It’s Wednesday night as I type this, and on Friday, my relationship with Aggressive Fat Loss will end.  I am officially going to lean bulk.  This means that I am going to eat in a controlled caloric surplus for the express purpose of gaining muscle.  And that’s where the topic of superstitions comes in.  I don’t mean fear of black cats or bad luck for breaking a mirror.  I’m referring to the psychological term superstition.  It refers to the belief that if success is accompanied by a random event, the person (or animal) will associate the event with success.  (Also works for bad things too.)

This is the product of our own brains working against us.  Our brains are designed to recognize patterns.  We are hard wired to learn from our experiences and continue what has worked in the past.  This is known as heuristics.  Unfortunately, our brains can also recognize patterns even where none exists, and this is especially true when it comes to losing weight.  Losing weight is a very long, intentional process.  Even though it all comes down to a caloric deficit, there are a large number of variables to account for, and the research is often controversial with multiple credible researchers lining up on opposite sides of a given issue.

So when a person successfully loses a lot of weight, they become highly attached to any behavior or action that occurred during the process, even if the action had no or minimal effect on their weight loss.  When I first started AFL, the recommendation in the program is walk 45 – 60 minutes on the days you don’t lift weights.  It just so happens that 3 laps around my neighborhood takes about 55 minutes, so that’s what I did four times a week for several months.  Then, midsummer, I participated in a steps competition at work (team with the most steps after eight weeks wins a Fitbit…most inefficient way in the world to win something if you ask me).  Toward the end of the competition, I was doing 5 laps around the neighborhood.  Even though it was miserable, took too long, and my feet hurt and got blisters, once the competition had ended I was actually afraid to go back to only 3 laps.  “What if my weightloss stalls?  What if the only reason I was losing weight was the extra calories of the extra two laps?”  You get the idea.

What about this bulking thing?

Most people who begin this Kinobody journey by cutting a lot of weight don’t plan to simply get thin.  Once they’ve lost weight, the goal is usually then to gain muscle mass.  The problem is that after months of working hard to lose weight, they become afraid to eat more.  When you’ve deprived yourself for seven, eight, even 24 months to get thin, the last thing in the world you want to do is get fat again.

The problem of, course, is that it’s impossible to build a significant amount of muscle while maintaining a deficit.  Heck, it’s practically impossible to build muscle while eating maintenance calories.  To grow muscle, you really need a surplus.  So the one thing that a person needs to do in order to build muscle is the one thing that person is afraid of—even when they know better.  I’ve seen it dozens of times on the Kinobody Facebook group.  I’ve even experienced it myself even though my plan was always to bulk after losing the weight, and even though I’ve been far more successful losing weight than I ever thought I could be.  After all, my weight trend has been up for the last 15 years.

Casting out fear

So let’s run some numbers and see just how silly it is to be afraid of bulking.  The Kinobbody Greek God program recommends a lean bulk of about 1900 extra calories per week.  On the Facebook group, there is a current controversy over whether beginners and intermediates should follow that recommendation or do a slightly larger bulk of 3500 calorie weekly surplus (500 extra calories per day).  Now if you remember your fat math, one pound of fat is 3500 calories.  So if every single calorie of surplus went into fat, I’d gain one pound of fat per week.  It would take me 50 weeks (an entire year) to gain all that fat back.

Let’s say, just half of the surplus calories get funneled into fat, then in one year, I’d gain 25 pounds of fat.  And if just a quarter of the calories go into fat, then I’d only gain 12.5 pounds of fat in a year’s time.  Now I’m only planning on bulking through March (7 months), so in that time, assuming 25% of the surplus going into fat, I could expect approximately 7.5 pounds of fat.  From my experience with AFL, It should only take about 2 months to lose those 7.5 pounds of extra fat.

So don’t fear the bulk.  Embrace the bulk.  Seven months of eating 3000 calories instead of 1925 calories.  You get to eat that way all through Thanksgiving, Halloween, and New Year!  You even get to eat that way for Valentine’s Day.  If you really want to go to town, save 200 calories each day, and have an extra 1200 calories for an epic 4200 calorie day (a solid Thanksgiving plan).

Don’t cut too long

The decision to stop cutting and start bulking is complicated.  The general recommendation is cut until you’re about 10% body fat, and then bulk until you’re about 15% bodyfat, and then lean down again.  I’m only about 13-14% body fat, and I haven’t quite hit my leanness goals (as defined by waist measurement and having a six pack).  So why am I bulking?  Three reasons.

  • The longer you cut, the harder it becomes.  I’ve been cutting for 7 months now.  At first my daily calories were 2000, and I lost almost 2 pounds a week.  Now my daily calories are 1815, and I lose less than half a pound a week.  As you lose weight, your body doesn’t need as many calories.  That makes it progressively harder to keep losing weight.
  • Cutting is stressful—quite literally.  Your body thinks you’re going to starve to death and tries to mitigate things by losing excess muscle.  So you have to do heavy strength training to convince your body to hold on to muscle and lose fat instead.  This causes your body to be stressed.  Eventually, your body will adjust hormonally to reduce your metabolic rate.  This was the subject of the Biggest Loser Study that I discuss here.
  • Cutting is also stressful mentally.

Bulking gives you a mental break and resets your hormones.  Most importantly it allows you to gain muscle.  At my current weight, I probably would have to lose 7-8 pounds of fat to achieve a 10% bodyfat.  I would look ridiculously skinny at 160 pounds, and it would probably take 3-4 more months.   By lean bulking I’ll add hopefully 10-15 pounds of muscle in the next seven months with only a small amount of fat.  Then when it comes time to lose the fat, I can do so at a higher (more enjoyable) daily calorie intake, and it won’t take as long to lose, so it won’t be as stressful.  So that’s the plan.

I had already been considering pursuing a lean bulk when Greg came out with this video, confirming my decision.

 

Why do you keep emphasizing lean bulk?

A lean bulk is a controlled bulk.  In my case, 500 calories over maintenance, or about 3000 calories per day, while maintaining an appropriate macronutrient balance.  The traditional way of bulking is just eat a lot, which is of course how I got into this problem in the first place.  So don’t just bulk.  Lean bulk!

Stir Fry Chicken

Stir Fry Chicken

Here is one of my go to recipes for a high protein, low calorie meal.  One of the most challenging things that a lot of people just starting on higher protein diets face, is that’s actually quite difficult to eat enough protein.  A lot of people end up relying on protein shakes to get enough protein.  Others find themselves choking down dry, tasteless chicken breast.  When I first started the Kinobody Aggressive Fat Loss Diet, I had to eat 160g of protein, and often found it hard to get enough protein in while enjoying it, until I came up with this solution.

Here’s a recipe that makes a large amount of chicken breast taste amazing and features a large amount of vegetables in an equally satisfying format.  For a little while I was eating this every single day.  The main reason I stopped is that it takes a while to prep, and personally, I like it fresh—not left over.  I still eat this once or twice a week, but I’ve switched to Taco Shredded Chicken for my daily protein intake due to its easier prep.

Recipe Ingredients

  • Chicken breast (variable amounts; depending on what else I’m eating that day, it’s usually 300 – 450 g raw)
  • Coconut oil (1 tsp)
  • Garlic powder to taste
  • Assorted Vegetables (some common choice for me
    • Onion
    • Bell peppers of various colors
    • Broccoli
    • Zucchini
    • Cucumber
    • Carrots
    • Celery
  • Sauces of choice (some fun choices
    • Teriyaki
    • Soy Sauce (with or without honey)
    • Sriracha
    • Lime juice and lemongrass

Directions

  1. Chop the vegetables and weigh each one (for logging in myfitnesspal).
  2. Cut the chicken into small pieces or strips and season with a small amount of salt
  3. Heat a 1/2 teaspoon of coconut oil over medium heat and saute the chicken with as much garlic as you like.
  4. Just before the chicken is completely done, hit it with some sauce.
  5. Put the chicken in a bowl and set aside
  6. Add another 1/2 teaspoon of coconut oil to the pan and saute the vegetables.
  7. When the vegetables are still al dente but almost ready, hit them with some sauce.
  8. Return the chicken to the pan and stir.
  9. Plate and eat.

That’s pretty much it.  You can eat it as is or serve it over rice if you want to up your carb/calorie count.  I usually use about 3/4 cups (cooked) of jasmine rice.  If you want to kick the flavor up a notch, add the rice to veggies.

Chicken Stir Fry for the Whole Family

Chicken Stir Fry for the Whole Family

Macronutrients for this meal.

A typical meal of say 400g of chicken, 150g of zucchini, and 100g of carrots (with the coconut oil) is:

  •  560 calories
  • 97g protein
  • 14g carbs
  • 9g fat

The same meal with 3/4 cups of cooked jasmine rice is

  • 710 calories
  • 100g protein
  • 48g carbs
  • 10g fat

That meal will satisfy you for several hours and set you up very nicely to have a whatever you want for dinner and have 300 caloaries left for dessert.  (Well, that’s what it does for me anyway.)

What if I need to cook for my whole family?

No problem. You do everything the same except that you need to do some 7th grade math (ratios and proportions).  Say that you’re going to cook 800g of chicken for the whole family, and you need to eat 300g of chicken.  That gives you a ratio of 300:800 or 3:8.  You just apply that ratio to each ingredient to log it in myfitnesspal.  To figure out your total serving, when the whole dish is done, weigh the entire amount of food, and apply the same ratio to the total weight.

If that explanation was too difficult, I’ve created a spreadsheet that you can just fill out.  Fill in the total weight for each ingredient, the total weight, and your desired serving of chicken (raw), and it will automagically calculate everything for you.

Six Months and 38 pounds lighter

212 lbs in November 2015 vs 178 lbs in June 2016

212 lbs in November 2015 vs 178 lbs in June 2016

A little less than six months ago, my journey into fatness ended, and I started losing weight.  I’ve chronicled the beginning of my fat loss journey here and how I lost the weight here.  For all but the first three weeks I used the Kinobody Aggressive Fat Loss program.  Today it’s time to show my progress.

For your protection, the photos are blurred.  If you really want to see them, you’ll have to click on them.  I must warn you that the photos below show middle aged man torso and abdomen.  Now it’s quite possible that those photos aren’t me at all, and are just some guy I found on the Kinobody Facebook Group.  But before we get to the photos, let’s have some stats.

Starting 6 months later
Weight 212 174
Waist 38 33
Pull ups bodyweight x 4 40 lbs x 6
Dips 10 lbs x 8 70 lbs x 7
Overhead Press 100 lbs x 5 135 lbs x 5
Inclined Bench 155 lbs x 5 175 lbs x 5
Bulgarian Split Squats 80 lbs x 6 150 lbs x 5

6 month Progress Photos

Okay, and without further ado, here are the photos.  The “before” photos are at 197 pounds after losing 15 pounds, so they’re not as dramatic as they might be otherwise.

weight-comparison-01-scanned

Click on the image to view it unblurred. You have been WARNED!!!

weight-comparison-02-blurred

Click on the image to view it unblurred. You have been WARNED!!!

weight-comparison-03-blurred

Click on the image to view it unblurred. You have been WARNED!!!

 

Okay, so there you have it.  Half naked, middle aged man flesh.  I’m currently lighter than I’ve been since 1997, and my waist hasn’t been 33 inches since before then.  So you you might be asking, “what’s next?”  The answer is, I’m going to try and lose another 5 pounds or so until I have a bona fide 6 pack.  Then I’ll transition to the Kinobody Greek God bulking program to gain 10-15 pounds of muscle over the next two years.

Long term, I’ll be doing what fellow Kinobody user, Scott Belott (scroll down to the first testimonial), recommends: I’ll bulk from June through January, so I’ll get to enjoy food at all the major holidays, and then cut the excess fat from February to May to be beachworthy.  (Is that a word?)

If you want to learn more:

Taco Shredded Chicken

If you listen to any Hollywood “body transformation” stories, one common theme you’ll hear is people being tired of eating “boiled chicken breast”.  The thing about chicken breast is that it’s very low fat and has no carbs in it, so it’s almost all protein.  The problem is that it doesn’t have much flavor has a tendency to dry out easily.  Even if you’re on a relatively “low” protein diet for a fitness person (0.82 – 1g per pound of bodyweight, at 175 pounds, you’re still eating between 150 to 165 grams of protein daily.

That’s a lot of protein, and chicken breast is one of the easiest ways to get that protein, even if it’s not the most fun.  This particular recipe makes boiled chicken delicious, moist, and easy to eat.  I first learned about it in this particular form Jack Spirko of The Survival Podcast, although the basic concept is quite common.  Basically you’re making crockpot chicken breast, and then shredding it.

Ingredients

  • 2 – 4 pounds chicken breast (if you use more, you’ll probably need more of the other ingredients)
  • One jar of salsa (I usually use Trader Joes green tomatillo salsa, but feel free to experiment)
  • Juice of 1-2 limes (if you want to up the ante, add the zest one of them)
  • 1-8 garlic cloves
  • Chili powder to taste (I usually do 2 tablespoons; Jack’s original recipe uses “taco seasoning”)
  • Salt and Pepper to taste (I usually don’t use salt here, and add it to whatever I use the chicken with)

Instructions:

  1. Turn the crockpot on high.
  2. Dump the jar of salsa, lime juice, garlic cloves, and chili powder into a large crockpot.  Stir together.
  3. Optional: Wait about 5-10 minutes until the mixture is hot
  4. Place your chicken breasts in the crockpot, and make sure they are coated with the mixture.  One easy way to do this is to put them in upside down, and then flip them over.
  5. Cover with lid (very important; crockpots don’t work right if you forget this step)
  6. Wait 4 hours.  Remove Lid.
  7. Remove the chicken from the crockpot and shred with two forks.
  8. Dump the rest of the liquid mixture on top of the chicken and mix until even.
  9. Done.  Use as is or refrigerate for future use.

So what are the macros on this thing?

95% of the calories come from the chicken breast, so I completely ignore the calories from the salsa.  A jar of Trader Joe’s Salsa Verde has about 110 calories in it, and you’re spreading it out over 3-4 pounds of chicken, but if you really want to track every calorie, knock yourself out.  To figure out the calories

  1. Weigh the raw chicken.  Let’s say it’s 1560 grams.
  2. Once the chicken is cooked, and you’ve added the liquid back in, weigh it again.  Let’s says it’s 1740 grams.
  3. Divide the raw weight by the cooked weight, and you’ll get a decimal.  In our case 1560/1740 = .8965 or round it to .9.
  4. WRITE DOWN THAT NUMBER!
  5. Now let’s say you want to use 400 grams of chicken breast for a recipe, just divide 400 by the number in step 3.  400/.9 = 444 grams.  That’s how much of our final prepared product you should weight out to get 400 grams.
  6. Log 400 grams of raw chicken breast in MyFitnessPal (or whatever you use.)

So how do I use this stuff?

Use it like chicken.  Eat it.  But in case you’re imagination deprived, here’s a couple quick meals:

Shredded Chicken Bowl

This kind of mimics the main ingredients of a Chipotle Burrito bowl (minus the sour cream and corn).  It has a huge amount of protein in it, and when you see this in the bowl, you’re going to think, “there’s no way I’m going to finish all that.”  It’s a great first meal, because it’s high in protein with moderate carbs, and relatively low fat.  It’ll provide a large proportion of your daily protein intake while leaving you tons of calories for the rest of your day.  To reduce the carbs and calories you can leave out either the rice or the tortillas.  If you want to up the fat a bit, use tortilla chips instead of tortillas.

Calories and Macros:

  • Calories: 937
  • Protein: 114 grams
  • Carbohydrates 82 grams
  • Fat 15 grams

Ingredients:

  • 400 grams of chicken breast (raw weight using the calculation technique above)
  • 3/4 cup of cooked rice
  • 1/2 cup of canned black beans
  • One ounce of sharp cheddar cheese
  • 3 small corn tortillas

Mix the first four ingredients together.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Eat along with the tortillas.

Shredded Chicken Omelet

This doesn’t really look like an omelet or taste like one, but it has egg in it, so…whatever.  This is kind of the opposite of the recipe above.  It’s got a relatively small amount of protein, almost no carb, and a decent amount of fat.  You could reduce the fat by leaving the butter out, but why would you want to.  It’s a great “small meal”.  You could also leave out the butter and egg and use the mixture to make chicken and cheese quesadillas.

Calories and Macros:

  • Calories: 456
  • Protein: 49 grams
  • Carbohydrates 2 grams
  • Fat 28 grams

Ingredients:

  • 100 grams of chicken breast (raw weight using the calculation technique above)
  • 10 grams of butter (I prefer Kerry Gold)
  • 2 slices of reduced fat cheese (44 grams; I use Finlandia variety pack from Costco.)
  • 2 eggs

Melt the butter in a pan over medium and cook the chicken until it begins to dry out a bit.  (Personally I hit the chicken with some extra chili powder for extra flavor.)  Place the 2 slices of cheese on top and wait until it melts.  Use a spatula to mix the melted cheese through the chicken.  Scramble two eggs in a glass along with some salt to taste.  Pour the eggs over the chicken and immediately begin stirring the egg throughout the chicken so that’s it’s evenly dispersed.  Turn the heat to low, and once the egg is mostly congealed, form a flat chicken/egg patty and allow to cook for about 30 seconds.  Flip and allow the other side to cook to desired doneness.  Serve.

Alton Brown’s Homemade Chili Powder

This recipe comes from the Good Eats episode “The Big Chili.”  It’s a phenomenally versatile seasoning that can be used for anything from scrambled eggs to tacos to chili.  It uses dried chiles.  In South Florida, Walmart now sells these in bulk.  So I just get six of each chile (double Alton’s original recipe).

Ingredients:

  • 6 Ancho Chiles
  • 6 Guajillo or Cascabel Chiles
  • 6 Arbol or Japones Chiles (these add a bit of heat, so you could use any dried hot chile, such as dried cayenne)
  • 4 tablespoons whole cumin seeds (you can use powder if you can’t find seeds)
  • 4 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 2 teaspoon smoked paprika (this can be hard to find at most stores; I found it at Whole Foods.)

Instructions

  1. Cut the stem end off each of the chiles, Cut a slit in the side and shake or rub the seeds into the trash.  (You might want to wear gloves if you’re processing a very hot chile.)
  2. Cut the chiles into small pieces and place in a heavy skillet over medium heat along with the cumin seeds.  Keep the cumin and chiles moving until they start to smell fragrant.
  3. Remove from the heat and place into a blender.  In my experience when working with this double recipe, it’s better to pulse it a few times, and don’t let it go too long.  Otherwise, the blender base will get hot, and the powder at the bottom will form a a cake that prevents the rest of the mixture from becoming blended.  If you have a Vitamix with the dry blade, that would be ideal.  Be very careful about opening the blender as you’re essentially making pepper spray (albeit a mild one).  Don’t put your face in it.
  4. Once the chiles and cumin are blended to a powder, add the garlic, oregano, and paprika and pulse to mix.

That’s it.  You’re done.  This stuff is amazing.  And since you’ve been such a good audience, I’m going to give you a couple recipes that use it: