Essays

Choosing your first Japanese knife

Okay, so which knife should I get?

A Primer on Japanese Waterstones

"So I opted for the awesomeness of this Japanese steel you were talking about. I mean that Tojiro DP gyuto is cheap! ... What? I can't just sharpen it with a pull through sharpener? I can damage the blade with the steel that came with my Henckels set? I need "special" sharpening stones? How much are we talking here? MORE THAN THE KNIFE COSTS? WHY DID I LISTEN TO YOU?!?!?!?!"

A Primer on Japanese Knives

When Jen and I first got married, I registered for Wusthof knives because, of course, they were so much superior to Henckels. I knew there were better knives in the world, especially from Japan, but they seemed to cost my firstborn, and I didn't really know how to buy them in the first place, so I was happy with my selection. Soon after (but not soon enough to return the Wusthofs) the Japanese invaded a Bed Bath and Beyond near you with a little help from Alton Brown. I had a strong case of Shun-lust, but being the practical, thrifty person that I am, I made do.

Fast forward *cough* years, and the Boss says something to the effect of, "maybe we should get another chef's knife so that when we're both needing it, we don't have to keep waiting." Naturally I knew that this was my chance to acquire a Japanese knife. So a week of underslept nights later, I purchased my first Japanese knife. (Review to come.)

I will be documenting what I found in a series of posts, so that I don't have to do it again, and perhaps it will help you, dear reader, acquire a Japanese instrument of cutting joy more quickly than I did.

Upgrading from Shared Hosting - Part 4 - Considering Google Apps

Major Update

Although Google seems to be determined to hide it, you can migrate much of your existing account using the methods documented here. For example:

  1. Log in to google with the account you want to transfer data from.
  2. Now go to this link. You'll need to change the e-mail addresses to match your source and destination accounts.

Upgrading from Shared Hosting - Part 3 - Preparing to move

The essential steps in moving are:

  1. Move your domain name to an alternative registrar (if your web host registered your domain name for you.
  2. Move your nameservers/Edit your DNS as appropriate
  3. Consider your e-mail provider
  4. Choose a new account
  5. Set up the account and migrate data
  6. Test the site
  7. Point your DNS records to your new account
  8. Cancel your old account

This article will deal with steps 1 - 3.

Move your domain name to an alternative registrar

Upgrading from Shared Hosting - Part 2 - Best practices

These best practices apply no matter whether you keep your current account, upgrade your shared account, or move to a VPS or Dedicated Server. (Many of these were gleaned from readings on webhostingtalk.com and lowendbox.com.)

Pay Monthly

It can be very attractive to pay annually or even prepay several years in advance because hosting companies often provide deep discounts or "freebies" such as a free domain registration. This can be a mistake for a number of reasons:

Upgrading from Shared Hosting - Part 1 - Deciding on a plan

It's pretty inexpensive and easy to set up a website these days. Companies like Hostgator and Dreamhost have you search for a domain name, fill out a couple forms, enter a credit card and congratulations. You now have a website. After a while, you may feel that your needs have outgrown your account, or that the service is not up to par or that your website is too slow. It's obviously time for an upgrade, but from what to what?

From What?

Testing out of College Courses -- AP, CLEP, and DSST

There are basically three traditional ways to get out of college courses. All three involve taking a test that shows basic competency in the course material. Many high school students are familiar with AP (Advanced Placement) courses. You take a course in high school, then at the end of the school year, you take the AP test, and if you score high enough on it, you get college credit.

The main problem with AP courses is that they are only available to high school students. Once you've graduated, it's too late. Another problem is that it takes a whole school year to get your credit. This is where CLEP (College Level Examination Program) and DSST (Dantes Standardized Subject Tests) come in.

Close Quarters Tactics (CQT) with Randy Cain

This past weekend I joined thirteen others in taking a Close Quarters Tactics class at Southern Exposure Training in Lakeland with Randy Cain.

The class has two major focuses (foci?):

  1. Some hand to hand techniques to retain your firearm or disarm an opponent.
  2. Incorporating the hand to hand techniques into the overall firearm system.

Training Days

The Work--Ideas Matter

Ideas Matter. What you believe affects what you do.

Introduction

Welcome to "The Work." I am not yet sure what the end result of this effort will be, but I invite you to participate along the way. The idea for this blog series was originally an effort to improve my teaching. At Palm Beach Atlantic University, our Provost, Joe Kloba, had the wild and squirrelly idea that a Christian university should not merely provide a Christian atmosphere but should provide something uniquely Christian in terms of intellectual life and ideas.

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